The Future of Storage in Container Space: Part 1

The rise of container technology has created a new challenge for the storage industry. Within containers, applications, and computation resources are now incredibly mobile, while storage still has to remain persistent and accessible. Here’s how Red Hat is working to address the storage needs of container workloads.

In modern microservice-based architectures, each container is a transient object. It might live on one server for a while and then get moved over to another if directed by an orchestrator tool. While a container keeps its bundle of application software and dependencies during its lifecycle, it usually does not keep application data within the container. Nor should it. After all, in this model a container is designed to run only what is needed and when it is needed. When done, the container is allowed (in fact encouraged) to disappear. If an application’s data were held inside that same application container, too, then pfft!

That’s a challenge.

Continue reading “The Future of Storage in Container Space: Part 1”

Superfluidity Project: One Network to Rule Them All!

The Superfluidity Project was a 33-month European (H2020) research project (July 2015–April 2018) aimed at achieving superfluidity on the Internet: the capability to instantiate services on-the-fly, run them anywhere in the network (core, aggregation, edge), and shift them transparently to different locations. The project especially focused on 5G networks and tried to go one step further into the virtualization and orchestration of different network elements, including radio and network processing components, such as BBUs, EPCs, P-GW, S-GW, PCRF, MME, load balancers, SDN controllers, and others.

For more information about it, you can visit both the official project website, as well as my previous blog post.

Continue reading “Superfluidity Project: One Network to Rule Them All!”

Bringing Automation to Container Space

The wonders of automation have been thoroughly enjoyed by sysadmins in recent years with tools like Ansible enabling rapid deployment of applications and services across servers and cloud-based platforms. But as the IT world evolves to more container-based technologies, tools like Ansible have not translated well to orchestration-level actions.

This is changing rapidly, thanks to the new Automation Broker project. Part of the OpenShift ecosystem, Automation Broker connects the gap between provisioning servers and provisioning containers.

Continue reading “Bringing Automation to Container Space”